Saturday, May 25th, 2013

Let Your Passion Be Your Freedom

By Karen Dodd on Dec 18 2012 • Filed under Balance

Let Your Passion Free You (photo by: dinko1967)On a recent vacation to Hawaii, I found myself unexpectedly swimming with a beautiful big sea turtle. I’m a bit of a nervous snorkeler and after being bashed against some lava rocks with the increasing power of the waves, I signaled my husband that I wanted to call it a day. As I passed over yet another large rock, I put my hands down to fend myself off. To my astonishment, the rock moved! It turned out to be a sea turtle.

Nervous and already tired, I hesitated. However, my excitement got the better of me and without another thought, I turned tail to follow as it swam out to sea.I distinctly remember listening to my previously jagged breath relax, and as I swam alongside the magnificent creature I was able to look into one of his eyes.The most amazing feeling of calm came over me. 
 
I realized that in that moment, I had let my passion override my often debilitating nervousness in the water. It was the most liberating experience.
 
How could you let your passion be your freedom?
 
Intention, Attention, No Tension
 
You might be familiar with the fact that elephants are sometimes tethered when they are very young. Curiously, as they grow and become stronger they come to believe that nothing has changed since they were small and so they don’t try to break free from their bonds.
 
When we wish to manifest something in our business or personal lives, we’ve learned that we need to start by setting our intention. Next, many of us have been conditioned by well-meaning gurus that whatever we put our attention on grows stronger and prompts us to take more action. 
 
As humans, sometimes all we have to do is realize that from a state of calm or peaceful meditation – no tension – we can access more of our potential by unconsciously unlocking the chains that keep us bound. Often, you simply have to push open a door that you thought was latched and suddenly, you’re free.
 
Is This Really What You Want To Be Doing?
 
As we’re approaching the holiday season, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by all the things you think you should do. But do you really want to do all those things?
 
Having been buried in writing my first novel this year, I’ve been a bit lax in entertaining and cooking for friends. A couple of weeks ago, I thought I really should have a big open house and invite all our neighbours as well as friends from outside our little village. However, when I got quiet and listened to myself, I realized that I really only wanted to have a small group of intimate friends and do simple food so I could really enjoy their company. 
 
My passion for spending quality time with close friends, while keeping my sanity, gave me the freedom to make the decision that was right for me.
 
YOUR Aha Moment
 
Intention and attention is certainly useful in helping us to achieve our goals. But here’s what I’ve noticed. For things to work out in my best interest, I know that my emotions have to be in alignment with what I think I want (or a challenge I wish to overcome) for things to fall smoothly into place. This is not to negate the need for hard work at times but as Epictetus once said:
 
“No great thing is created suddenly. There must be time. Give your best and always be kind.” 
 
Happy holidays and be kind to yourself!


Former CEO of the Global Institute of Small Business Marketing, Karen Dodd is writer-in-residence at Latent-Literati.com, a blog for those who consider themselves empty-nesters, late-bloomers, or finally have time to explore their interest in writing. Her mission is to support, inspire and share insights so that latent writers don’t live one more day with their “music” still in them. Avid readers are welcome too!


Leave a Response

No soliciting.

Your email address will never be displayed, but, is required to validate your comment.

In accordance with the Terms of Service, submitting a comment grants Entrepreneurial Woman Magazine a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/web site in attribution.